Brimstage Orchard: the Orchard Book, Ch 5

 

Bramley - G4, H3, J3

Our Bramleys are all large.

 

What distinguishes a Bramley's Seedling?

Cropping: Heavy. Flowering group: 3; Poor Pollinator; Triploid, Vigour: Very large, Bearing regularly, Partial tip-bearer; Overall disease resistance: Good; Late Harvest; Keeps 3 months or more; quality: Exceptional Flavour, Sharper; Good for cooking, juice, cider; cooks to Puree; Juice style: Sharp (cider); Fruit colour: Green; Blossom colour: Pink – dark; Leaf colour: Green; Frost: Susceptible, OK in Wirral; hardiness: -30F / -34C?

The tree was raised from a pip by a young girl, Mary Ann Brailsford. The house, with the mature tree in the garden, was later sold to a Matthew Bramley who allowed cuttings to be propagated. The original tree still survives - and can be seen in a video made by the BBC in 2011.

Our Bramleys are on M25, the most vigorous apple rootstock. It produces a standard apple tree of around 6m height after 10 years or so, and is the best choice for old-fashioned traditional orchards.

Advantages: Doesn't require much looking after, and ideal for growing traditional large apple trees.

Disadvantages: You will need a ladder and fruit-picking bags to pick the apples - an enjoyable community activity but obviously not without dangers.

G4 - Bramley: Flowered well 2015 (date?) good crop 2013, 2014, 2015,2016, 2018. Large windfall of fruit in high winds in 2013. Plan: good current shape: keep height checked by tackling fresh vertical growth, thorough winter pruning

H3 - Bramley: Flowered well 2015 (date?) good crop 2013 to 2018. Large windfall of fruit in high winds in 2013. Plan: good current shape: keep height checked by tackling fresh vertical growth, thorough winter pruning

 
 
 

J3- Bramley: (picture above) Flowered well 2015 (date?) good crop 2013 to 2018. Large windfall of fruit in high winds in 2013. Plan: good current shape: keep height checked by tackling fresh vertical growth, thorough winter pruning