Brimstage Orchard: the Orchard Book Ch. 3

 

Single Specimens: B9, C3, F1, F11, G5, H2, J8, G8, H9, G9

James Grieve

Unknown

Brookes

 

F11 - James Grieve. Good pollinator in group 3. This is the last of the three originally planted. They were badly cankered  with mower damage to the main trunks spreading into the branches. There was clear sign of stress - the tree is overshadowed by a huge horse chestnut. All three were trimmed ready for uprooting in 2012. This one, however, recovered fully and set out strong and healthy branches with rigorous growth. Next year's pruning plan is to limit the side growth to the three highest laterals and tackle any crossing and crowded branches. On M25 rootstock.

F1 - Cox's orange Pippin

Another strong growing tree. a fine graft given by Pete of Friends of Burton Manor Gardens.

This is the classic English apple, often regarded as the finest of all apples. It sets the benchmark for flavour in apples to which all others aspire. The aromatic complexity and depth of flavours in a good Cox's Orange Pippin are remarkable.

Cox's Orange Pippin is a mid/late season variety and is probably at its best if picked when fully ripe, or picked slightly under-ripe and left in storage for a month or so - it is not a long-keeper though.

Although primarily considered a variety for eating fresh, Cox is an excellent apple for juice / cider blends as well. It is also a versatile culinary apple, with an inherently sweet flavour when baked, and is a common ingredient in English apple preserves, chutneys, and mincemeat."

The next years training will concentrate on extending the strong trunk and choosing 2/3 laterals

B9 - Brookes on standard M25 rootstock.

This is a strong and well balanced tree, fully pruned over 3 winters and summers. Good yield: easy to access.

The next years pruning will concentrate on limiting the strong vertical shoots to the 5th outward-facing bud

G5 -William Crump

This is a descendant of Worcester Pearmain. we have only one of this variety. Described by Orange Pippin, the tree nurserymen:

"William Crump is an interesting marriage of the complex sophisticated flavours of Cox's Orange Pippin with the refreshing fruity flavours of Worcester Pearmain.

Visually it is exactly what you would expect - it looks like a red-coloured Cox. You might also expect given this pedigree it would be an early-season apple like Worcester Pearmain, or mid-season like Cox - but it ripens a bit later in the season and keeps somewhat better than Cox as well."

The next years pruning will concentrate on limiting the strong vertical shoots to the 5th outward-facing bud

H2- Burr Knot:  another young tree grafted by Pete of the Friends of Burton Manor Gardens. Burr Knott is a tangy apple, dating from 1818. It was ripe and edible in the first week in September, 2015. Pollinates with Greensleeves, Brookes, Cox's

Burr Knot

Cox's Orange Pippin

William Crump

C3- A?. This was marked on the 2011 chart as "no apples" but is recovering after modest attention. Growth is slow and the tree is small. Fruit will be taken for identification. It is most likely a Red Windsor.

Greengage

J8 - Greengage. This was a surprise to find a tasty green fruit: on the original plan, this was marked as a plum. It was ripe and edible in the first week in September, 2015. The plan for late summer pruning is to leave apart from removing any broken or diseased stems.

The original supplier of trees to the orchard has since advised that the plum tree was grafted onto a St Julien A rootstock, so this is most likely what has grown up and fruited, replacing the plum. In 2019 we intend to thin out to three stems and cleft graft some heritage plums and gages onto the rootstock

 

 
 

Bee Bench

Ashmead's Kernel

a traditional Cheshire variety, this grafted apple was planted in 2016. In 2019 there will be some winter shaping by pruning, and encouragment for development into a semi-standard

a traditional Cheshire variety, a lightly russeted apple with a good, slightly nutty flavour. This grafted apple was planted in 2016. In 2019 there will be some winter shaping by pruning, and encouragment for development into a semi-standard